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The UCP2-866 A/A genotype is associated with low density lipoprotein particle sizes in the general population

Taku Hamada, Kazuhiko Kotani, Shinji Fujiwara, Yoshiko Sano, Masayuki Domichi, Kokoro Tsuzaki, Kaoru Takahashi, Naoki Sakane

Med Sci Monit 2008; 14(3): CR107-111

ID: 836574


Background: It has been reported that a common G-->A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the position -866 of the uncoupling protein-2 promoter (UCP2-866 G/A SNP) modulates UCP2 expression in adipose tissue and pancreatic beta-cell function, and lipid profiles. Reduced low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size is a significant predictor of the development for coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the UCP2-866 G/A SNP was associated with serum LDL particle characteristics in a general Japanese population.
Material and Method: In 279 subjects (age 65+/-13 years), body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, blood pressure, and blood biochemical profiles were measured. The UCP2-866 G/A SNP was determined with a fluorescence-based allele-specific DNA primer assay system. LDL particle characteristics were analyzed by high-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.
Results: The frequency of the -866 A allele was 47.8%. There was no difference in triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and small dense LDL levels between genotypes. However, subjects with the -866 A/A genotype had significantly lower mean LDL particle size levels (263.5+/-4.9 angstroms) than those with the -866 G/G genotype (264.6+/-4.9 angstroms, P=0.034). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the -866 A/A genotype was a significant variable contributing to the variance in the reduced LDL particle size levels (P=0.012).
Conclusions: The -866 A/A genotype may contribute to reduced LDL particle size levels, a significant risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease.

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