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eISSN: 1643-3750

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ADHD and growth: anthropometric changes in medicated and non-medicated ADHD boys

Radek Ptacek, Hana Kuzelova, Ivo Paclt, Ilja Zukov, Slavomil Fischer

Med Sci Monit 2009; 15(12): CR595-599

ID: 878275


Background: ADHD children can show changes in growth and development. Many studies describe these changes as a side effect of stimulant medication. However, changes in somatic development can also appear in non-medicated children. This suggests that the changes could be a manifestation of the disorder itself and not just a side effect of the treatment.
Material and Method: This study compared anthropometric characteristics in medicated and non-medicated ADHD boys (n=104, age 4-16 years) with the normal non-clinical population. In contrast to most previous studies, complex anthropometrical measurements were used.
Results: The results showed significant differences between children with ADHD and those without the diagnosis, the differences found to be statistically significant (p<0.01) being signs of nutrition (percentage of fat, abdominal circumference) and growth suppression (lower body height, smaller head circumference). Differences between the medicated and non-medicated groups corresponded only to a lower value of body fat in the medicated children.
Conclusions: These results suggest that growth changes in ADHD children may be more specific to the disorder itself than to stimulant treatment.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
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