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1H-MRS in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) – the role of particular metabolites in prediction of MCI conversion to AD

Jerzy Walecki, Agnieszka Pawłowska, Tomasz Gabryelewicz, Jarosław B. Ćwikła, Maria Barcikowska, Tomasz Nesteruk

Med Sci Monit 2010; 16(1): 11-18

ID: 880576


Background: This study evaluated predictive value of brain 1H MRS in patients with MCI, who could have converted to Alzheimer disease (AS).
Material/Methods: The examination was performed on a group of 31 MCI subjects. All underwent neurologic and psychiatric tests, routine laboratory investigations, and standard neuropsychological examinations. MCI diagnosis was established based on criteria of the Mayo Clinic Group. ¹H MRS was performed with a single-voxel method using PRESS sequence. The VOI was located in the frontal, medial, and external temporal lobe regions.
Results: Patients had annual clinical control at least twice; in the beginning, 9 subjects were diagnosed as an amnestic MCI, and the others (22) had multidomain MCI. Baseline metabolic ratios (1H MRS) between 3 groups of patients, indicated significant difference in left frontal lobe in mI/H20 ratio, between patients with SD (0.27) and DP (0.22) (P=.03). There was a significant difference NAA/Cr (1.77 vs 1.43; P=.02). Significant differences within left temporal external lobes were found between patients with SD and DP in NAA/H2O ratio (0.55 vs 51; P=.04). Additional differences within medial temporal lobe were found between patients with DP and AD in Glx/H2O ratio (0.44 vs 0.34) on the right side (P=.02).
Conclusions: 1H MRS seems to be a sensitive method providing biochemical information using in vivo approach in patients with initial MCI, who, in significant numbers, developed a disease and/or converted to AD. Our findings concerning 1H MRS patients with MCI require further prospective studies.

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